Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Best way to remove the front rubber cone?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Best way to remove the front rubber cone?

    So, I have the trumpet and knuckle joint out, I would like to remove the rubber cone as well so I can replace it. I have read that you need to remove the top arm for it to come out?

    Can anyone shed any light on this please?

    Thanks in advance.

    Ryan

  • #2
    Once in a while, depending upon the condition of the cones, one can get them out without removing the upper arms. Might as well remove them, though. You won't be able to get the new ones and the trumpet and knuckle joint back in without doing so.
    The more I know about Minis, the more I know I don't know about Minis.

    Comment


    • #3
      Excerpts from the Haynes Manual:

      Undo and remove the nut and spring
      washer from each end of the upper arm pivot
      shaft.

      I removed the right side nut first, but it wouldn't pass through the area between the bolt shaft and the fender well, not enough of a gap. So, I tightened it up and removed the other side. Now, that nut and washer is off, but since the shaft is spinning I can't loosen up the other side. Any ideas?


      Undo and remove the two nuts, bolts and
      spring washers securing the pivot shaft thrust
      collar retaining plate, thrust collar and seal

      I was able to remove the front nut/bolt fine, but the one on the back side of the top arm seems impossible to get to. The only thing I can get back there is a wrench, but it doesn't seem to want to budge and I don't really have the room to make it move... Is this just because I havent been able to remove the bolt shaft for the top arm yet?

      Please help if you can, this whole suspension setup has been a lot more time consuming then I thought lol.

      Comment


      • #4
        The two nuts/bolts in question.



        You can just make it out on the back side.

        Comment


        • #5
          Try putting a little side load (push in or pull out or the arm) on the bolt.
          "remember, in this country, they drive on the wrong side of the road"
          ‘64 Austin Countryman-???
          '60's Austin mini truck - the chicken truck
          '60 Morris Van - Marvan
          '55 Chevy wagon- the heavy Chevy

          Comment


          • #6
            Upper arm shaft removal.
            1. Soak both large nuts with your favorite penetrating fluid. Let sit.
            2. Use 3/4" open end wrench to loosen the rear nut all the way until it is close to coming off. Far enough so that you know it will come off without sticking.
            3. Tighten the rear nut back up snuggly, but not real tight.
            4. Loosen and tighten the front nut as per 2 and 3 above.
            5. You should be able to get both of the nuts loose enough to remove by trying one or the other removing the most stubborn one first.
            6. If the rear nut won't clear all the way off the shaft without hanging up on the body (depends upon build quality of the car), leave it on the last few threads.
            7. Remove the two 1/4" bolts holding the retaining plate in place. The outside one is a through bolt with a nut and washer on the inside of the subframe tower. The inside bolt goes into a captive nut on the inside of the subframe tower with the lock washer under the head of the bolt.
            8. When the retaining plate is removed, push the shaft forward and out, removing the rear nut the last few threads if you were not able to get it off previously.

            Tips for reassembly.
            1. Make sure the big nuts and threads on the shafts are clean so that the nuts thread on easily.
            2. When putting the shaft back through the subframe and upper arm, thread the rear nut onto the shaft before the shaft is seated all the way in place and the retaining plate is installed.

            Other thoughts.
            1. If you are adept at removing the radiator, or have to take it out for another reason, getting to the left side upper arm fasteners is much easier with it out of the way.
            2. If you have a late model fuel injected air conditioned whiz bang automatic "1967" Pose Pack, take out a second mortgage on your house and pay someone else to do the work for you! (I think I'm out of town that week.)
            The more I know about Minis, the more I know I don't know about Minis.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yep! Time to raise the club dues. This kind of information is worth way more than $20 a year. Don

              Comment


              • #8
                A footnote, on some cars in some situations, depending upon how the brake pipes have been run, and what phase the moon is in, it is just possible to slide the upper arm shaft out the front with the retaining plate still attached. It's more likely to work on the left side. It saves some work. However, when it doesn't clear, it means more work putting things back together to get the front nut off.
                The more I know about Minis, the more I know I don't know about Minis.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks, going to have another go at it on Sunday

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Got it out, thank you!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Clean everything well before reinstalling; including, the subframe and holes where the upper arm seats.. Make sure the two big nuts will turn onto the upper arm shaft easily. Check the 1/4" bolt in the inner captive nut and the outer 1/4" bolt in the nut. They, too, should thread easily.
                      The more I know about Minis, the more I know I don't know about Minis.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cheleker View Post

                        Other thoughts.
                        1. If you are adept at removing the radiator, or have to take it out for another reason, getting to the left side upper arm fasteners is much easier with it out of the way.
                        2. If you have a late model fuel injected air conditioned whiz bang automatic "1967" Pose Pack, take out a second mortgage on your house and pay someone else to do the work for you! (I think I'm out of town that week.)
                        The other night when I did the front suspension in Cher's late model fuel injected air conditioned whiz bang automatic it wasn't to bad.. just one more step of discharging the r134a and then removing the a/c filter cartridge to get at the top of the plug bolt. that was a whole 5 minutes of time, NOT including the discharging which was about 45min or so. 4 hours later, finally done with a few knicked up knuckles and sore hands! Good thing the build quality of Cher's Mini was good and left plenty of room around that 3/4 bolt to spin off entirely and "just enough" access on both sides for the forward facing 3/4 nut. Also it was a GREAT thing we didn't have to take a second mortgage out on the house for this job. We installed the moulton smooth a ride kit w/ adjusta-ride suspension and new KYB excel-G shocks, which was the most expensive part i suppose.

                        Good thing my "1968" pose pack doesn't need this service any time soon!

                        God i love mini's, and by this i mean ALL mini's! They are so interesting in compared to other cars!

                        Tommorrow I'll be doing the rear suspension cones and shocks, i guess the rears are easy, so that will be a relief.

                        But i want to thank you Chuck for your very helpful information and tips on how to remove the top arm, i think it helped out and made the process to be less time consuming.

                        p.s. i will add a review for the moulton smooth a ride and adjusta ride suspension later on when all the suspension is fully settled and then setup properly. so far i can say one thing, the front moulton cones are about 1/2inch higher!!! so seriously, they were VERY tricky to fit in comparison to normal cones. something to consider.
                        Last edited by timc; 05-05-2009, 07:02 AM.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X